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SORRENTO OASIS IS THE BEST AFFORDABLE CONDO OF THE YEAR – LAMUDI.COM.PH

The city of Pasig is abuzz—with verve, activity, and a tireless dynamism that has catapulted it to one of the top metropolises in the country. But in this vigorous urban jungle, there is a quiet haven tucked in one of its busiest arteries buffered from the city’s booming energy.
This is Sorrento Oasis—a sprawling, resort-themed residential community inspired by the tropics of Italy, recently hailed as the Best Value for Money Condo of the Year 2018 in Luzon at the prestigious 2nd Philippines Buyers’ Choice Property Awards by The Outlook by Lamudi.

This mid-rise community, a project under the Aspire brand by Filinvest, has resort-styled amenities, refreshing environs, stylish living spaces, and a thoughtfully-designed layout, all carefully tailored to meet the dynamic demands of its urban professional and upwardly-mobile denizens. With topnotch designs and amenities on par with its more expensive competitors, and for a price range of less than PHP 100,000 per square meter, Sorrento Oasis is indeed a winning real-estate development.

Sorrento Oasis gives you the freedom to upgrade to the vibrant and active lifestyle you want. Strategically located right along the bustling C. Raymundo Avenue in Pasig City, this residential enclave puts you firmly at the heart of urban living, while its expert design creates a serene haven that insulates you from the city buzz.

The Outlook Awards brings together the expertise of industry leaders and authorities, combined with the votes of thousands of active Filipino home-hunters on Lamudi.com.ph. The Best Value for Money Condo award recognizes cost-effective condominium projects (PHP 100,000 and below per square meter) that complement moderate pricing with remarkable concept, design, amenities, and facilities. The judges shortlisted finalists that meet these criteria, from which thousands of Lamudi users voted for the best project.

This recognition awarded to Sorrento Oasis, and to other projects by Filinvest Land, Inc., certainly solidifies the mark of excellence for which the company is best known.

Find out more about Sorrento Oasis and other Aspire by Filinvest projects. Contact us at (00886) 972 810 004 [LINE, IMO, VIBER, WHATSAPP, FB].

 

Source: https://filinvest.com/awards/sorrento-oasis-is-the-best-affordable-condo-of-the-year-lamudicomph

CLAREMONT HAILED AS LUZON’S BEST AFFORDABLE HOUSE OF THE YEAR

A peaceful enclave, surrounded by refreshing amenities, framed by picturesque vistas of Mt. Arayat and the breathtaking Luzon mountain range, and located strategically close to the Clark Special Economic Zone, Claremont is a smart value horizontal community built to fulfill the hardworking Filipino’s dream of owning their home.
With topnotch amenities prized at less than PHP 50,000 per square meter, Claremont is truly the year’s most affordable home. Granted by digital real estate marketplace Lamudi in The Outlook 2018 Philippines Buyers’ Choice Property Awards, the award is given to the property that “best matches moderate pricing with excellence in concept, design, amenities, and facilities.” From a pool of five finalists carefully handpicked by a panel comprised of industry experts, Claremont was voted by thousands of active Filipino home-hunters as the Best Affordable House of the Year 2018 in Luzon.
Claremont is a project of Futura by Filinvest, the real estate giant’s brand that offers smart-value homes built with our signature “Buhos Tibay” seal of quality. With sleek, Modern Asian homes, high-quality features and amenities, and a superior location a stone’s throw away from the Clark Special Economic Zone, Claremont will give you a comfortable, metropolitan lifestyle, surrounded by lush, natural landscapes. It offers a safe neighborhood, quality residences, and top recreational amenities all make it the ideal family home.
Claremont’s win, together with the other victories cinched by Filinvest Land, Inc., is a testament to the company’s steadfast efforts of building the Filipino dream.
Find out more about Claremont and other Futura by Filinvest projects. Contact us at (00886) 972 810 004 [LINE, IMO, VIBER, WHATSAPP, FB].

Read on the official website: https://filinvest.com/awards/claremont-hailed-as-luzons-best-affordable-house-of-the-year

 

COLLAR JOBS – Black, Blue, Gold, Gray, Green, Open, Pink, Scarlet, White

  • Black Collar Worker is used to refer to workers in the mining or the oil industry. Sometimes, it is also used to refer to people who are employed in black marketing activities.
  • Blue Collar Worker is a member of the working class, who performs manual labor and earns an hourly wage. It originates from the popularity that blue color enjoys among manual labourers.
  • Gold Collar Worker is a newly formed phrase which has been used to describe either young, low-wage workers who invest in conspicuous luxury (often with parental support). It is also used to refer to highly-skilled knowledge people who are highly valuable to the company.Example: Lawyers, doctors, research scientists, etc.
  • Gray Collar Worker refers to the balance of employed people not classified as white or blue collar. Although grey-collar is something used to describe those who work beyond the age of retirement. Example: IT employees, health care professionals, skilled technicians, etc.
  • Green Collar Worker is a worker who is employed in the environmental sectors of the economy. Example: People working in alternate energy sources like solar panels, Greenpeace, World Wide Fund for nature etc.
  • Open Collar Worker is a worker who works from home, especially via the internet.
  • Pink Collar Worker is employed in a job that is traditionally considered to be women’s work and is often low-paid. Example: Librarian, maid, flight attendant, receptionist, secretary, etc.
  • Scarlet Collar Worker is a term often used to refer to people who work in the pornography industry, especially women entrepreneurs in the field of internet pornography. The color scarlet has traditionally been associated with adultery.
  • White Collar Worker is a salaried professional, typically referring to general office workers and management. It originates from color of dress shirts worn by professional and clerical workers.

Posted December 5, 2011 by EXAMS CORNER in General Knowledge. Tagged: .

 

Types of Collar Workers

The terms “blue collar” and “white collar” was coined in the early 20th century by Upton Sinclair; these terms are occupational classifications that distinguish workers who perform manual labor from workers who perform professional jobs.

Historically, blue-collar workers wore uniforms, usually blue, and worked in trade occupations. White-collar workers typically wore white, button down shirts and worked in office settings. Other aspects that distinguish blue-collar and white-collar workers include earnings and education level.
Due to the new industries that happened after the Industrial Revolution a lot of Collar workers categories exist based on the colors of their collars worn as work; these can commonly reflect one’s occupation or sometimes gender.
Some job categories involve duties that fall under one or more of the categories listed above, or none of the above. These categories include:
Blue-Collar Worker –This term was first used in 1924; it is a member of the working class, who performs manual labor and earns an hourly wage. It originates from the popularity that blue color enjoys among manual-laborers.

White-Collar Worker – The term “white-collar worker” was coined in the 1930’s by Upton Sinclair; it is a salaried professional, typically referring to general office workers and management. It originates from color of dress shirts worn by professional and clerical workers.

Gold-Collar Worker– was first used by Robert Earl Kelley in his 1985 book The Gold-Collar Worker; It is a newly formed phrase which has been used to describe either young, low-wage workers who invest in conspicuous luxury (often with parental support). It is also used to refer to highly-skilled knowledge people who are highly valuable to the company. Example: Lawyers, doctors, research scientists, etc.

 

Gray-Collar Worker – refers to the balance of employed people not classified as white or blue collar. Although grey-collar is something used to describe those who work beyond the age of retirement. Example: Fire fighters, police officers, health care professionals, Security Guards, etc.

 

Green-Collar Worker –  was first used by Patrick Heffernan in 1976; it is a worker who is employed in the environmental sectors of the economy. Example: People working in alternate energy sources like solar panels, Greenpeace, World Wide Fund for nature etc.

 

Pink-Collar Worker – is employed in a job that is traditionally considered to be women’s work and is often low-paid. The term “pink-collar” was popularized in the late 1990’s by writer and social critic Louise Kapp Howe specially who performs jobs in the service industry example: nurses, secretaries, and elementary school teachers.

 

Scarlet-Collar Worker – is a term often used to refer to people who work in the pornography industry, especially women entrepreneurs in the field of internet pornography. The color scarlet has traditionally been associated with adultery.

 

Orange-Collar Worker – Prison laborers, named for the orange jumpsuits commonly worn by inmates.

 

Yellow-Collar Worker – People in the creative field, They may spend time doing both white and blue collar tasks as well as tasks outside either category example: Photographers, Filmmakers, Directors, Editors.

 

Red-Collar Worker – Government workers of all types and farmers. Derived from compensation received from red ink budget. Also in China, refers to Communist Party officials in private companies

 

Open-Collar Worker –is a worker who works from home, especially via the internet.

 

Black-Collar Worker – is used to refer to workers in the mining or the oil industry. Sometimes, it is also used to refer to people who are employed in black marketing activities.

 

No-Collar Worker – The new, exponentially emerging class rising up in America consisting of often over-qualified but unemployed persons or tech-industry professionals who eschew collars altogether.

By Hassan Choughari

 

What Will Happen To a Condominium Investment After 50 Years?

This is one of the most common concerns raised by condominium buyers. And it is a very relevant question to ask especially since we are talking about millions of money here.

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In the Philippines, there is a law that protects the interest of the unit owners in a condominium project. This is the Republic Act 4726 or The Condominium Act of the Philippines which was mandated on June 18, 1966.

To answer the concern of the condominium owners and the would-be owners, here is an excerpt of the act.

SECTION 8. Where several persons own condominiums in a condominium project, an action may be brought by one or more such persons for partition thereof by sale of the entire project, as if the owners of all of the condominiums in such project were co-owners of the entire project in the same proportion as their interests in the common areas: Provided, however, That a partition shall be made only upon a showing:

  1. That three years after damage or destruction to the project which renders material part thereof unit for its use prior thereto, the project has not been rebuilt or repaired substantially to its state prior to its damage or destruction, or

  2. That damage or destruction to the project has rendered one-half or more of the units therein untenantable and that condominium owners holding in aggregate more than thirty percent interest in the common areas are opposed to repair or restoration of the project; or

  3. That the project has been in existence in excess of fifty yearsthat it is obsolete and uneconomic, and that condominium owners holding in aggregate more than fifty percent interest in the common areas are opposed to repair or restoration or remodeling or modernizing of the project; or

  4. That the project or a material part thereof has been condemned or expropriated and that the project is no longer viable, or that the condominium owners holding in aggregate more than seventy percent interest in the common areas are opposed to continuation of the condominium regime after expropriation or condemnation of a material portion thereof; or

  5. That the conditions for such partition by sale set forth in the declaration of restrictions, duly registered in accordance with the terms of this Act, have been met.

 

It’s not like you will buy a condominium property and then after 50 years, your investment will be gone, just like that. When a condominium project is fully turned over to the unit owners, it becomes just like a corporation, and you are one of the owners of that corporation if you have a unit there.

So it follows that you will have a “say” in the decision making as to what to do with the whole building, and if it has been decided that the property is going to be sold or demolished so that a new property will be developed on the area, you will get your appropriate share of the proceeds of the sale.

Just like any investment, your condominium property can last, can be profitable and can be passed on to your heir(s).

 

Courtesy of PhilPropertyExpert

15 Things You Need to Know about the Condominium Act

Planning to purchase a condo soon? Then it might be time to brush up on your knowledge on the Philippines’ Condominium Act

Times have changed. In the past, people thought that owning a house was like living the dream, or that the bigger the house, the better it was. Nowadays, people tend to think and want smaller; phones and computers got smaller, and these days, many people want their spaces to be more compact as well, which means getting a condo unit.

Young professionals starting up their career, couples looking to start a family, or even small families are often those who look for such spaces. Aside from it being an ideal living space for the single or the settled-down, it is an excellent investment for those looking for an extra passive income. After all, besides the business opportunities, there is a certain air of luxury and practicality associated with owning a condo unit.

In line with that, let us look at some of the things you will need to know and consider when deciding to purchase a condo unit. Most of the things we will be dealing with are taken off of or based on Republic Act No. 4726, or more commonly known as the Condominium Act. We will be tackling the issues from both the unit owner and the condominium owner’s points of view, to see how the law works for both sides.

1. What is a condominium?

A condominium, according to the law, is an “interest in a real property consisting of a separate interest in a unit in a residential, industrial, or commercial building and an undivided interest in common, directly or indirectly, in the land in which it is located and in other common areas of the building.”

In other words, a condominium is a building where sections of which can be owned individually by a person or, in some cases, a corporation. This can be for either a residential, industrial, or commercial purpose.

2. Who can own condominiums?

Filipino citizens and corporations can own condominiums. Foreigners, however, are restricted to owning no more than 40 percent of the total and outstanding capital stock of a corporation, which must be Filipino-owned and controlled. In addition to that restriction, foreigners and foreign corporations are, by law, prohibited to own land.

3. Who can own condominium units?

Again, Filipino citizens and corporations can own condominium units. This time, however, foreigners, by virtue of the Condominium Act, are allowed to purchase and acquire condominium units.

4. What is my stake in a condominium?

As a unit owner, you are, in essence, a co-owner of the condominium, entitled to such privileges and limited by such restrictions that may follow the title.

5. What forms part of a condominium unit?

Everything within the boundaries of your unit forms part of the same. According to the law, the interior surfaces of the perimeter walls, floors, ceilings, windows, and doors form the boundary of your unit. That is, of course, unless the master deed or the declaration of restrictions prescribed by the condominium corporation or the administration stipulate otherwise.

6. Am I allowed to alter anything beyond the boundaries of my unit?

Generally, no. However, if the administration allows such alteration or does not prohibit the same, then you may be allowed to. A thorough read of the house rules or the contract would be a good idea.

7. What do not form part of the condominium unit?

In most cases, areas that are not found inside the unit are deemed to be excluded from the unit but the condominium law itself lists aspects of properties that generally do not form part of the unit. To wit: “bearing walls, columns, floors, roofs, foundations, and other common structural elements (e.g., lobbies, stairways, hallways, and other common areas), elevator equipment and shafts, central heating, central refrigeration, and central air-conditioning equipment, reservoirs, tanks, pumps, and other central services and facilities, pipes, ducts, flutes, chutes, conduits, wires, and other utility installations, wherever located.” An exception to the list are those outlets that are located within the unit.

Hallways, like other common areas, are not parts of condo units and, hence, are not owned exclusively by a single owner. However, these areas are owned collectively by the condo corporation. 

8. Can I freely sell my unit?

Yes. That is not prohibited in the condominium law. When you sell your unit, however, you are not just selling the unit itself, you are also selling your interest in the common areas, as well as your membership and shareholdings in the condominium corporation.

9. Can I freely sell my condominium?

Not exactly. Selling a unit may be simple, but selling a condominium is restricted by certain rules under the Condominium Act. One of such restrictions is the ownership requirement. For condominiums where the common areas are co-owned by the owners of the units, the law requires that the purchaser be either a Filipino citizen or corporation—a corporation that is at least 60 percent owned and controlled by Filipinos. For condominiums owned by corporations, the sale will be deemed invalid if such a sale would result in the foreign interest in the corporation exceeding the limits prescribed by law, which in this case, is 40 percent. In other words, in both cases, the foreign ownership in the purchasing corporation cannot exceed 40 percent, otherwise the sale would be invalid.

10. Can I mortgage my unit for a loan?

Yes. The condominium law states that “each condominium owner shall have the exclusive right to mortgage, pledge, or encumber his condominium and to have the same appraised independently of the other condominium owner is personal to him.”

Like any property, a condo unit can be mortgaged by its owner for a loan. 

11. Can the condominium corporation sell the condominium without my consent?

As a general rule, it can. However, if the master deed contains a requirement that the property should first be offered to the other condominium owners within a reasonable time before offering it to third parties, then it may not.

Another restriction, however, is one that has been amended to the Corporation Code by Republic Act No. 7899, which states that, as an owner, you shall not, sell, exchange, lease, or otherwise dispose of the common areas of a condominium without the approval of the simple majority of the registered owners, subject as well, to the approval of the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB).

12. The Condominium Act stipulates that the owners can sell the condominium after 50 years. Does that mean that I will not have any say in the sale?

No, that is not the case. Upon turnover of the unit to you, you become a member of the corporation that owns the condominium. Hence, your concurrence or dissent on the matter will count. If, however, it has been decided that the building shall be sold, then you will be compensated your appropriate share from the proceeds of the sale.

13. Who owns the common areas in a condominium?

Generally, titles to the common areas are held by a corporation formed for the purpose. However, the condominium law also states that the common areas are held in common by the unit holders, in equal share for each unit.

14. What are my rights as a condominium unit owner?

Aside from those already mentioned, the only other right you have as a unit owner is the right to renovate your unit, for as long as all renovations are done within the boundaries of your unit. All restrictions on your rights and activities are those that are stipulated in the declaration of restrictions or on the contract you signed upon the turnover of the unit to you.

15. I own a condominium building, and I want to amend or revoke the master deed. May I do so without reservation?

No. The Condominium Act states that you can only do this upon the registration of an instrument (a formal legal document) executed by a simple majority of the registered owners of the property. In this case, a simple majority could mean either of the two: a majority based on per-unit ownership or a majority based on the floor area of ownership.

For condominiums used for either residential or commercial purposes, the former would apply, while if it is for a mix of both purposes, it is the latter. This requirement also stipulates that the registered owners must be notified in advance. Evidence of a vote of a simple majority must also be submitted to the HLURB.

 

 

Courtesy of  25 March 2016