Category Archives: Prayers & Saints

Catholic church prayers in English and/or Ilocano versions

Prayers for the faithful departed

Here are some prayers I’ve learned from Sor. Geniveve Dulay in her Religion class 14 years ago..

(1) “Jesus, Mary, I love you save souls.”

(2) Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory Be to the Father (“Gloria Patri”).
“Eternal rest grant to them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May they rest in peace. Amen.”

or

“Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May the souls of the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.”

(3) “Eternal Father, I offer Thee the Most Precious Blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the masses said throughout the world today, for all the holy souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, for sinners in the universal church, those in my own home and within my family. Amen.”

Another prayer from an online source:

“O most gentle Heart of Jesus, ever present in the Blessed Sacrament, ever consumed with burning love for the poor captive souls in purgatory, have mercy on the souls of Thy departed servants. Be not severe in Thy judgments, but let some drops of Thy Precious Blood fall upon the devouring flames. And do Thou, O merciful Savior, send Thy holy angels to conduct them to a place of refreshment, light and peace. Amen.”

***

Seven Offerings Of The Precious Blood

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for the propagation and exaltation of my dear Mother the Holy Church, for the safety and prosperity of her visible Head, the Holy Roman Pontiff, for the cardinals, bishops and pastors of souls, and for all the ministers of the sanctuary.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen. Blessed and praised forevermore be Jesus Who hath saved us by His Precious Blood! Amen.

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for the peace and concord of nations, for the conversion of the enemies of our holy faith and for the happiness of all Christian people.

Glory be, etc. above

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for the repentance of unbelievers, the extirpation of all heresies, and the conversion of sinners.

Glory be, etc. above

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for all my relations, friends and enemies, for the poor, the sick, and those in tribulation, and for all those for whom Thou willest I should pray, or knowest that I ought to pray.

Glory be, etc. above

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for all those who shall this day pass to another life, that Thou mayest preserve them from the pains of hell, and admit them the more readily to the possession of Thy Glory.

Glory be, etc. above

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for all those who are lovers of this Treasure of His Blood, and for all those who join with me in adoring and honoring It, and for all those who try to spread devotion to It . .

Glory be, etc. above

Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus, Thy Beloved Son and my Divine Redeemer, for all my wants, spiritual and temporal, for the holy souls in Purgatory, and particularly for those who in their lifetime were most devoted to this Price of our redemption, and to the sorrows and pains of our dear Mother, most Holy Mary . . .

Glory be, etc. above

Blessed and exalted be the Blood of Jesus, now and always, and through all eternity. Amen.

A HIDDEN TREASURE

Appearing to one of the sisters of her community shortly after her death, St. Teresa of Avila told the sister that she would be willing to return to a life of suffering on earth until the end of time if thereby she could merit that degree of glory with which God rewards one devoutly recited “Hail Mary.” St. Paul speaks in like manner when he says: “The sufferings of this life are not to be compared with the glory to come.”

If one short prayer is thus rewarded, what reward awaits those who offer to the Eternal Father, the Precious Blood of Jesus. “An offering,” says Father Faber, “is more than a prayer. In prayer we are the recipients, but when we make an offering God vouchsafes to accept something from us.” In Our Lord’s own words to Sister Mary Martha Chambon, Apostle of the Holy Wounds: “To offer to the Eternal Father the Sacred Wounds of Jesus is to offer Him His Glory, to offer Heaven to Heaven. Each time you offer to My Father the merits of My Divine Wounds, you gain an immense fortune . . . You must not remain poor, your Father is very rich.”

If you and I, at this very moment, were standing on the threshold of eternity, we would see a limitless duration extending before us which our vision would fail to terminate. Looking on this endlessness the awful truth would come to us that the time of merit had passed forever. The saints realized this truth while yet in life, and we can see the vastness of their reward.

Those who have passed into eternity realize that there will be no further opportunities for additional merit, for time has passed forever. If regrets were possible in Heaven, unused opportunities would be the cause, for the blessed know what greater capacity for giving accidental honor to God they would have had if they had used all their opportunities. Because of God’s mercy they have no regrets, but their status is sealed forever.

The position of the priest in heaven must be tremendous for he offers daily a Victim-of-Infinite-Worth; and yet each one of us can offer the same Victim in a different manner by sincerely saying:

“Eternal Father, I offer Thee the merits of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus.”
Just suppose that if you were to make the Seven Offerings each day; it would take only a few minutes of time, and yet the vast merit gained would last eternally.

What an investment!

THE PRECIOUS BLOOD AND HEAVEN

Promises of Our Lord to Sister Mary Martha Chambon
Those who pray with humility and who meditate on My Passion, shall one day participate in the glory of My Divine wounds. Their members will receive from them a resplendent beauty and glory.
The more you shall have contemplated My Painful wounds on this earth, the higher shall be your contemplation of them glorious in Heaven.
The soul who during life has honored and studied the Wounds of Our Lord Jesus Christ and has offered Them to the Eternal Father for the Souls in Purgatory will be accompanied at the moment of death by the Holy Virgin and the Angels; and Our Lord on the Cross, all brilliant in glory will receive her and crown her.

REFLECTIONS
Life is short and death is sure; the hour of death remains obscure.
A soul you have, and only one; if that be lost all hope is gone.
Waste not your time, while time shall last; for after death ’tis ever past.
The all-seeing God your Judge will be, and Heaven or Hell your destiny.
All earthly things will fleet away, Eternity will ever stay.

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School Prayer

[SP0001]

Lord our GOD,
in Your wisdom and love
You surround us with the mysteries of the universe.
In times long past You sent us Your prophets
to teach Your laws
and to bear witness to Your undying love.
You sent us Your Son
to teach us by word and example
that true wisdom comes from You alone.

Send Your Spirit upon these students and their teachers
and fill them with Your wisdom and blessings.
Grant that during this academic year
they may devote themselves to their studies
and share what they have learned from others.

Grant this through Christ our Lord.

Amen.

St. Teresa of Avila

St. Teresa of Avila (1515-1582)

(Patron Saint of: Headaches)

St. Teresa of Avila

 

Image taken from http://www.bridgebuilding.com/narr/mi425.html

ST THERESA OF AVILA

West of Madrid, there is a small town, called Avila. Teresa of Ahumada, called later Teresa of Avila, was a nun of the Carmelite Order – from “Encarnacion” – for the reincarnation of Jesus Christ- , who was punished several times by the Inquisition because of the stubborn reports on meditation. The scandal started on the 24th of August 1562 and the general opinion was unanimous: “A woman should not be allowed to do such a thing”.

On the pretext that she had to help her sister move out, Teresa of Avila left her monastery in the morning and met four nuns who were friends of hers, in a house in the San Rouque region. They secretly arranged the house for the purpose of later becoming a monastery, known under the name of “At Saint Joseph of Avila.”

The new monastery had no income, as no parent or brother had signed any contract to support it. The monk Angel of Salzar was assaulted by the angry crowd in the town, who knew nothing of what these women had done. This is when the courthouse and the consistory were called in, which decided that the monastery should be evacuated, even if it meant the forceful removal of the women out of the building. Blinded by fury, violently, some throw stones, some pushed on the monastery’s door while screaming “You mad woman!” An order to evacuate the monastery is emitted along with a papal order to excommunicate anyone entering the premises.

400 years later, Teresa of Avila becomes considered as the most renowned saint of the Catholic Church, while also being a classic of the Christian meditation. Pope Paul the 6th offered her, in 1970 the highest Catholic title: “Doctor Ecclesiae – professor of Christianity”.

At Salamanca, next to Avila, is the most renowned university of the 16th century. Professor Domingo de Spoto (1495-1560) said: “There are excluded from all the church’s dignities: women, bastards, who are rather women than men, and the mentally alienated who have no chance of getting better”, while Ignatius of Loyola, the most prestigious saint of the era supported the idea that “Satan behaves just like a woman does.”

Teresa of Avila was born on the 28th of March, 1515. She would write in her autobiography: “The thought that I was born a woman makes me mad”.

In 1535, at the age of just 20, she decides to become a nun and leaves to a Carmelite monastery.

She believed that there is an adventure a woman can live just as well as a man: the journey itself and this journey is called meditation.

In the Middle Ages the women monasteries were true meditation schools, the nuns of the Carmelite Order (after the Carmel Mountain in Palestine) –with the colors of their vestments brown and white- have always had a special inclination towards meditation

At first, Teresa of Avila discovered nothing more in herself than fear and boredom. Wanting to have it all at once and fast, she had a mental shock, which accentuated, and for 9 months suffered of total paralysis. On the 15th of August 1539 the rumor that Teresa has died started to spread. The long Spanish vigil started, but four days later, Teresa’s eyes opened: she had survived her mental illness.

Teresa of Avila

Following the model of the first monastery, Teresa of Avila would found, throughout Spain, one after another, 17 monasteries. In the discussions she carried with the authorities she proved to be perseverant, a true businessperson.

As a main reform, Teresa introduced in the monasteries’ schedule two hours of meditation.

In 1575 she was accused by the priests of the Seville Inquisition, of things allowed only to a male monk (preaching and receiving confession). To escape, she obeyed  the questioning and gave proof of great amiability, then changed her spiritual guides often, and also her confession priests – informers, who were sending reports on her visions  to the church authorities.

If she had problems with the Jesuits, she demanded help to the Dominicans and then to the Franciscans, and if she fought all the monk church orders, she asked for help from the monk John of the Cross – monk of the Order of the Carmelites of Salamanca, who became a great mystic, together with her.

In 1568, Teresa of Avila trusted Saint John of the Cross with a branch of the Carmelites, this time with male members, who were to respect the rules established by her in the Reform program. The entire Spain is amazed: “A nun has created her own monk order!”

One of the men to bow with dignity in front of her and receive her blessing was the Seville archbishop, Christobal de Rojas. Felipe Sega, who was part of the papal court, denounced her to the pope as a “restless woman, wandering, disobedient and hidden.”

She had always managed to keep her interior peace, so necessary to write her two books, become classic now, which treated the subject of Catholic meditation: “The road to perfection” and “Soul bastion”.

Teresa of Avila believed, like the masters of the Japanese Zen, that meditation offers the possibility to break the barriers of logic: “If you want to be everything at the same time, you don’t have to be someone in particular.”

Before dying, at the age of 67, on the 4th of October 1582, she gathered her last powers to officiate the opening of the Alba monastery, moment in which her face lighted, filled with an indescribable joy.

St. Teresa of Avila

Teresa lived in an age of exploration as well as political, social and religious upheaval. It was the 16th century, a time of turmoil and reform. She was born before the Protestant Reformation and died almost 20 years after the closing of the Council of Trent.

The gift of GOD to Teresa in and through which she became holy and left her mark on the Church and the world is threefold: She was a woman; she was a contemplative; she was an active reformer.

As a woman, Teresa stood on her own two feet, even in the man’s world of her time. She was “her own woman,” entering the Carmelites despite strong opposition from her father. She is a person wrapped not so much in silence as in mystery. Beautiful, talented, outgoing, adaptable, affectionate, courageous, enthusiastic, she was totally human. Like Jesus, she was a mystery of paradoxes: wise, yet practical; intelligent, yet much in tune with her experience; a mystic, yet an energetic reformer. A holy woman, a womanly woman.

Teresa was a woman “for GOD,” a woman of prayer, discipline and compassion. Her heart belonged to GOD. Her ongoing conversion was an arduous lifelong struggle, involving ongoing purification and suffering. She was misunderstood, misjudged, opposed in her efforts at reform. Yet she struggled on, courageous and faithful; she struggled with her own mediocrity, her illness, her opposition. And in the midst of all this she clung to GOD in life and in prayer. Her writings on prayer and contemplation are drawn from her experience: powerful, practical and graceful. A woman of prayer; a woman for GOD.

Teresa was a woman “for others.” Though a contemplative, she spent much of her time and energy seeking to reform herself and the Carmelites, to lead them back to the full observance of the primitive Rule. She founded over a half-dozen new monasteries. She traveled, wrote, fought always to renew, to reform. In her self, in her prayer, in her life, in her efforts to reform, in all the people she touched, she was a woman for others, a woman who inspired and gave life.

Her writings, especially the Way of Perfection and The Interior Castle, have helped generations of believers.

In 1970, the Church gave her the title she had long held in the popular mind: doctor of the Church. She and St. Catherine of Siena were the first women so honored.

***

Ours is a time of turmoil, a time of reform and a time of liberation. Modern women have in Teresa a challenging example. Promoters of renewal, promoters of prayer, all have in Teresa a woman to reckon with, one whom they can admire and imitate.

***

Teresa knew well the continued presence and value of suffering (physical illness, opposition to reform, difficulties in prayer), but she grew to be able to embrace suffering, even desire it: “Lord, either to suffer or to die.” Toward the end of her life she exclaimed: “Oh, my Lord! How true it is that whoever works for You is paid in troubles! And what a precious price to those who love You if we understand its value.”

***

In The Book of My Life, Saint Teresa of Avila writes of seeking time to pray even as a child and turning often to the Rosary, a prayer dear to her mother.

Later as an adult and as a spiritual guide for her Carmelite sisters and brothers, Teresa wrote about the importance of being present to GOD in prayer: “Before we begin reciting the Hours or the Rosary, [let us consider] Whom we are going to address, and who we are that are addressing Him, so that we may do so in the way we should?” (The Way of Perfection).

Teresa calls you to be mindful in all of your spiritual practices that you are, in this moment, in relationship with our GOD.

Whom are you going to address?

***

Prayer of St. Theresa of Jesus

Heavenly Father, thank You for the gift
of a Holy fear, and a respect of You
and all that You are.

In being mindful of this
help me to always
keep Your Name Holy.

Equip me to be concerned
with those things that
concern You.

May I seek to never offend
or sadden You.

Penetrate my innermost heart,
that I may set You, my Lord
and my GOD, before my face
forever and shun all things that
are not a part of Your will.

May I always remember
the forgiveness and Grace that You
offer and readily provide, to all
who come to You and ask for it.

I Love You and thank You! Amen…

***

Quotes:

“Vocal prayer . . . must be accompanied by reflection. A prayer in which a person is not aware of Whom he is speaking to, what he is asking, who it is who is asking and of Whom, I don’t call prayer—–however much the lips may move.”

“Mental prayer in my opinion is nothing else than an intimate sharing between friends; it means taking time frequently to be alone with Him who we know loves us.”

“One must not think that a person who is suffering is not praying. He is offering up his sufferings to GOD, and many a time he is praying much more truly than one who goes away by himself and meditates his head off, and, if he has squeezed out a few tears, thinks that is prayer.”

“Christ has no body now, but yours.
No hands, no feet on earth, but yours.
Yours are the eyes through which
Christ looks compassion into the world.
Yours are the feet
with which Christ walks to do good.
Yours are the hands
with which Christ blesses the world.”

“Let nothing trouble you,
let nothing frighten you.
All things are passing;
GOD never changes.
Patience obtains all things.
He who possesses GOD lacks nothing:
GOD alone suffices.”

Source: American Catholic dot org

 

Teresa of Ávila

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

St. John Eudes

St. John Eudes (1601-1680)

“Our wish, our object, our chief preoccupation must be to form Jesus in ourselves, to make His Spirit, His devotion, His affections, His desires and His disposition live and reign there. All our religious exercises should be directed to this end. It is the work which GOD has given us to do unceasingly”

——-St. John Eudes, The Life and Reign of Jesus in Christian Souls.

~ ~ ~

How little we know where GOD’s grace will lead. Born on a farm in northern France, John died at 79 in the next “county” or department. In that time he was a religious, a parish missionary, founder of two religious communities and a great promoter of the devotion to the Sacred Heart and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

He joined the religious community of the Oratorians and was ordained a priest at 24. During severe plagues in 1627 and 1631, he volunteered to care for the stricken in his own diocese. Lest he infect his fellow religious, he lived in a huge cask in the middle of a field during the plague.

At age 32, John became a parish missionary. His gifts as preacher and confessor won him great popularity. He preached over 100 parish missions, some lasting from several weeks to several months.

In his concern with the spiritual improvement of the clergy, he realized that the greatest need was for seminaries. He had permission from his general superior, the bishop and even Cardinal Richelieu to begin this work, but the succeeding general superior disapproved.

After prayer and counsel, John decided it was best to leave the religious community. The same year he founded a new one, ultimately called the Eudists (Congregation of Jesus and Mary), devoted to the formation of the clergy by conducting diocesan seminaries. The new venture, while approved by individual bishops, met with immediate opposition, especially from Jansenists and some of his former associates.

John founded several seminaries in Normandy, but was unable to get approval from Rome (partly, it was said, because he did not use the most tactful approach).

In his parish mission work, John was disturbed by the sad condition of prostitutes who sought to escape their miserable life. Temporary shelters were found but arrangements were not satisfactory. A certain Madeleine Lamy, who had cared for several of the women, one day said to him, “Where are you off to now? To some church, I suppose, where you’ll gaze at the images and think yourself pious. And all the time what is really wanted of you is a decent house for these poor creatures.” The words, and the laughter of those present, struck deeply within him. The result was another new religious community, called the Sisters of Charity of the Refuge.

He is probably best known for the central theme of his writings: Jesus as the source of holiness, Mary as the model of the Christian life. His devotion to the Sacred Heart and to the Immaculate Heart of Mary led Pius XI to declare him the father of the liturgical cult of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary.

St. Isidore Chapel, San Bonifacio

Vision

A community of believers who are living in accordance to Christ’s teachings about love, benevolence, prayerfulness, spiritual nourishment, faithfulness, and humility

Mission

To evangelize, uplift human life, promote hope, love, peace, and unity, encourage haritable and humanitarian acts, challenge for spiritual renewal, and organize activities for family and community development though the blessings and grace of God, the guidance of the Holy Spirit, and the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Isidore

* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *

This blog serves as the official weblog of St. Isidore Catholic Chapel in San Bonifacio, which is under the supervision of St. Bartholomew Parish, San Manuel, Pagasinan.

The chapel was established circa 1989 and was founded by Mr. Remigio Frani and Mrs. Emma Frani. With the approval and guidance of Rev. Father Jacinto Dimas, who was the parish priest during that time, the success of bringing it to the community has been achieved and it continues to serve as a special place for spiritual/religious activities and an instrument for social functions and services. The support and generosity of volunteer residents and donors from the different towns and abroad are worth mentioning because the efforts to reach out and make God known and/or become closer to the people have produced significant results even before the building was put up.

St. Isidore, the farmer was chosen as the patron saint of the people of San Bonifacio since agriculture, specifically rice growing, is the primary industry that keeps this barangay sustainable. The choice for St. Isidore was suggested by the Dominican sisters (O.P.) of St. Mary’s Dominican School (formerly Marian High School), namely Sor. Genevieve Dulay, Sor. Teresita Tambo, and others (to follow). The contribution of Rev. Father Hurley John S. Solfelix, for sparing time to celebrate masses and teach catechesis and liturgical songs, and Sister Emy Peñera’s, for her assistance and advice, are deemed indispensable and worth our gratitude.

The first mass was celebrated by former Bishop Jesus Galang of the Diocese of Urdaneta. Religious activities such as Block Rosary, Stations of the Cross, and chanting the Passion of Christ (Pabasa in Filipino; Pasyon in Ilocano) are done on a regular basis. Additional activities like novena, processions on Good Friday and Feast Day of St. Isidore, free medical/dental mission, and relief goods/gift giving have been carried out to give people a chance to share/receive blessings, practice cooperation and voluntarism, smile and be happy, serve/appreciate others rather than to gossip, promote animosity or do detrimental acts, and maintain personal relationship with and keep one’s faith in God. In other words, to experience and understand what Jesus meant when he said “Love one another as I have Loved you”.

*~ * ~ * ~ *

BIOGRAPHY

Isidore the Laborer, also known as Isidore the Farmer, (Spanish: San Isidro Labrador), (c. 107015 May 1130) was a Spanish day laborer known for his goodness toward the poor and animals. He is the Catholic patron saint of farmers and of Madrid and of La Ceiba, Honduras.

Isidore was born to very poor parents near Madrid, about the year 1070. He was in the service of the wealthy Madrid landowner Juan de Vargas on a farm in the vicinity of Madrid. Juan de Vargas would later make him bailiff of his entire estate of Lower Caramanca.

Every morning before going to work, Isidore was accustomed to hearing a Mass at one of the churches in Madrid. One day his fellow-laborers complained to their master that Isidore was always late for work in the morning. Upon investigation, so runs the legend, the master found Isidore at prayer while an angel was doing the ploughing for him.

On another occasion, his master saw an angel ploughing on either side of him, so that Isidore’s work was equal to that of three of his fellow-labourers. Isidore is also said to have brought back to life his master’s deceased daughter, and to have caused a fountain of fresh water to burst from the dry earth in order to quench his master’s thirst.

St Isidore married Maria Torribia, a canonized saint, who is known as Santa María de la Cabeza in Spain because her head (cabeza in Spanish) is often carried in procession, especially during droughts. Isidore and Maria had one son, who died in his youth. On one occasion their son fell into a deep well and, at the prayers of his parents, the water of the well is said to have risen miraculously to the level of the ground, bringing the child with it, alive and well. Isidore and Maria then vowed continence and lived in separate houses.

Isidore died on May 15, 1130, at his birthplace close to Madrid. When King Philip III of Spain was cured of a deadly disease by touching the relics of the saint, the king replaced the old reliquary with a costly silver one.

Isidore was beatified in Rome on May 2, 1619 by Pope Paul V. He was canonized nearly three years later by Pope Gregory XV, along with Saints Ignatius of Loyola, Francis Xavier, Teresa of Avila, and Philip Neri, on March 12, 1622.

San Ysidro, California and San Ysidro, New Mexico were named after him.

His master Iván de Vargas’s house in Madrid is now a museum with temporary exhibitions on Madrilenian subjects, as well as on the life of the saint.

Feast day, Celebrations and festivals

St Isidore is widely venerated as the patron saint of peasants and day laborers, as he had been one himself. In 1947, at the request of the National Catholic Rural Life Conference, he was officially named patron of farmers, with a feast day on March 22 in all dioceses of the United States, with a proper Mass and Office.

Baroque statue of St. Isidore in Madrid

The traditional date of his liturgical feast, which, though not included in the General Roman Calendar has been celebrated for centuries in several countries and dioceses, is May 15. When St Isidore’s feast was first inserted into the calendar for the United States in the year 1947, the feast day of Saint John Baptist de La Salle was then celebrated on May 15, with the result that the celebration of his feast was assigned to March 22. With the reform of the Roman Catholic Calendar of Saints in 1969, St Isidore’s feast was restored to the May 15 date and celebrated as an Optional Memorial. In some places within the United States and Canada, his feast is celebrated on October 25, and in other locations and among Traditional Roman Catholics the March 22 date is retained.[2]

Many towns venerate St Isidore and his wife Saint Maria Torribia with processions in which the fields are blessed.

Corrales, New Mexico USA

In Corrales the town celebrates San Ysidro Fest day on May 15. Matachina’s dance through the street and fiesta is a big part in the city.

Spain

In La Orotava (Canary Islands), the greatest celebrations honor Isidore and Maria. The “Dance of Magos” (mago being Spanish for “magician”, but also used for “farmer” in Guanche), the “Blessing of the cattle”, and finally the Romería, or pilgrimage, are all celebrated to honor both patrons of this important city of the Canaries.

Celebrations honoring both saints are also held elsewhere on the islands. For years, the Alicantine locality of Castalla has been celebrating the Fair of San Isidro, where numerous companies display their products in a playful and festive atmosphere. A medieval swap meet and mechanical attractions are especially popular.

A large celebration is held in Estepona, (near Marbella) in Andalucia, where local celebrate the day by drinking a mix of brandy and a popular energy drink – which is named in his honour. This has led to St Isidore often being termed as the patron saint of krunk (because of the name of this combination drink in the US).

Chile

May 15 is San Isidro Day in Cuz-Cuz, about 5 kilometers from the city of Illapel, Choapa province, in the Coquimbo region of Chile. If the day falls on a Monday, the following Sunday is celebrated. Celebrations begin at noon with a Mass, followed by a procession and Chilean dances.

Peru

First Group of Shippers of San Isidro Labrador in Lima, Peru.

The residents of San Isidro de Carampá of Ayacucho in the city of Lima celebrate a San Isidro festival. The First Society of San Isidro de Carampá organizes the festival, along with the Butler and the Adornante festivals. In the evening, after the celebration of the Mass, a procession moves to the house of the Adornante. On the next day, Central Day, another Mass is said, this time celebrated by the Butler. Another procession is held, followed by a festival.

Philippines

Throughout the Philippine archipelago, several feast were celebrated and offered to St. Isidore. Among of them are:

  • The Sabugan ng Biyaya Festival (also known as simply Sabugan Festival) of the town of Agdangan, a small town in Quezon, is a thanksgiving event for the blessings that the town received, and to honor St. Isidore The Laborer.
  • The Nabas Bariw Festival is celebrated to commemorate the feast day of St. Isidore the Farmer, the patron saint of Nabas, a municipality of Aklan province in the Visayas.It is celebrated annually from 12 – 15 May. This celebration showcase the town’s hat, mat and other bariw products as well as the town’s unique tourism sites and natural attractions.
  • Also, May 15 celebrates the fiesta of San Isidro de Labrador in Talavera, Nueva Ecija, Philippines. Talavera is a 1st class municipality in the province of Nueva Ecija, one of the top producers of agricultural goods in the country. Its principal crops are rice, corn, and onions. The province is often referred to as the “Rice Granary of the Philippines”. The feast begins a few days before the feast day and is celebrated with a week of festivities, including daily novenas, Masses, processions, entertainment events and a fair (or perya). The fiesta is held on the actual day.
  • The colorful Lucban San Isidro Pahiyas Festival is also held in honor of Saints Isidore and Maria dela Cabeza every May 15 in Lucban, Quezon. It is in thanksgiving for a bountiful harvest.
  • Carabaos kneel before the church of San Isidro Labrador during the Town Fiesta of Pulilan, Bulacan.
  • San Isidro Labrador is also the parish saint of the town of Mogpog, Marinduque. During his feast day, the town people celebrates the Kangga Festival, which highlights Filipino farmer‘s customs and traditions, as well as a thanksgiving ritual for a bountiful harvest and the prosperity the town has achieved throughout the years.

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Saint Isidore the Laborer

References

  1. ^ Roman Martyrology 2001 for 21st-century date; Catholic Encyclopedia (1910) for (same) early 20th-century date
  2. ^ See the General Roman Calendar as in 1954, the General Roman Calendar of Pope Pius XII, and the General Roman Calendar of 1962.

This article incorporates text from the entry St. Isidore the Labourer in the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.

Retrieved 31 Aug 2009 from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isidore_the_Laborer

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NOVENA TO SAINT ISIDORE

FIRST DAY

PARTNERSHIP WITH GOD

Hymn

O Lord, as You have made the earth,
To man and beast have given birth,
Have given sun and rain that thence
The soil might give them sustenance:

We beg You make us willing to
Perform the law we get from You
That work of ours and grace of Yours
May bring the increase that endures.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. How manifold are your works, O Lord!
In wisdom you have wrought them all;
the earth is full of your creatures.

(Psalm 8)

All:

O Lord, our Lord, how glorious is your name over all the earth!
You have exalted your name above the heavens.

Out of the mouths of babes and sucklings
you have fashioned praise because of your foes,
to silence the hostile and the vengeful.

When I behold your heavens, the work of your fingers,
the moon and the stars which you set in place:

What is man that you should be mindful of him,
or the son of man that you should care for him?

You have made him little less than the angels,
and crowned him with glory and honor.

You have given him rule over the works of your hands,
putting all things under his feet:

All sheep and oxen,
yes, and the beasts of the field.
The birds of the air, the fishes of the sea,
and whatever swims the paths of the seas.

O Lord, our Lord,
how glorious is your name over all the earth!

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: How manifold are your works, O Lord! In wisdom you have wrought them
all; / the earth is full of your creatures.

P. (Chapter–Genesis 1:25 and 2:15)

God made all kinds of wild beasts,
every kind of cattle,
and every kind of creature crawling on the ground.
And God saw that it was good.
The Lord God took the man and placed him in the garden of Eden,
to till it and to keep it.

R. Thanks be to God.

V. You raise grass for the cattle and vegetation for men’s use.
R. Producing bread from the earth, and wine to gladden men’s hearts.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. Grant, we beg of You,
O Merciful Lord,
that through the intercession of blessed Isidore,
farmer and confessor,
we may forego the pride of worldly wisdom,
and that, through his merits and exemplary life,
we may, with all humility,
ever perform works pleasing to You, through our Lord,
Jesus Christ, Your Son,
who lives and is King and God with You,
in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
for ever and ever.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

The farmer’s is a sacred calling because he is a collaborator with God in the work of His creation. In partnership with God he becomes to men a provider of the food, fiber, and shelter they need. Let the farmer, then, no longer belittle himself in his own eyes. The farmer’s calling is among the noblest in all the world. The Lord considered it so, and the farmer must think of it in the same terms. With God he lives and works in the vast realms of His bountiful and beautiful nature. He is not one of the millions who in thick formations swarm through factory gates. He is a free man as he strides through his fields guiding a plow, sowing the seed, or harvesting the crop. The farmer’s calling is one that must command great respect. Much knowledge and skill are required to manage well the farmstead with its land and fences, barns and granaries, tools and machinery. Farming is among the greatest of human arts. The farmer must be an artisan and a craftsman, a capitalist, financier, manager, worker; a producer and a seller. He must know soil and seed, poultry and cattle; he must know when to till the soil, cultivate his fields, and harvest his crops. In the presence of his Lord the farmer should recall all this, not in a spirit of vainglory or pride, but in grateful appreciation of the calling that God gave him as a tiller of the soil. Praise and thanksgiving should rise in his heart as he reflects on the high regard the Lord has showered upon him and his work. (From “Partnership with God,” by the Most Reverend Aloisius J. Muench.)

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

SECOND DAY

FAMILY LIFE IN CHRIST

Lord, who to share creative life
Created mankind man and wife,
To be with You creators of
The objects of Your endless love;

As Jesus loves the Church His bride,
Let our love be intensified,
Let love of one another be
Our pledge of love eternally.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your Son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. Happy they who dwell in your house! / Continually they praise you.

(Psalm 127)

All: Happy are you who fear the Lord, who walk in his ways!

For you shall eat the fruit of your handiwork; / happy shall you be, and
favored.

Your wife shall be like a fruitful vine / in the recesses of your home.

Your children like olive plants / around your table.

Behold, thus is the man blessed / who fears the Lord.

The Lord bless you from Sion; / may you see the prosperity of Jerusalem all
the days of your life;

May you see your children’s children. / Peace be upon Israel!

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: Happy they who dwell in your house! / Continually they praise you.

P. (Chapter–Psalm 26:4-5) One thing I ask of the Lord: this I seek: to
dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, that I may gaze on
the loveliness of the Lord and contemplate his temple. For he will hide me
in his abode in the day of trouble; he will conceal me in the shelter of
his tent; he will set me high upon a rock.

R. Thanks be to God.
V. I will make all your children to be taught of the Lord.
R. And an abundance of peace to your children.
V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

V. We offer You the sacrifice of praise, O Lord, and humbly pray that
through the intercession of the Blessed Virgin, Mother of God, and of Saint
Joseph, You may establish our families in peace and grace, through the same
Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.
V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

Christian marriage is a union in Christ between man and woman. It is a vocation of mutual love and fidelity in which each partner helps the other to draw closer to God, and the grace received by the husband and wife in the sacrament of matrimony strengthens them toward the achievement of this end. Since the rural familv is the very foundation of the vocation of farming, it is providential that God should have raised up a holy family, St. Isidore and his wife, S. Maria de la Cabeza, to be the patrons of rural people. He wanted to teach us that the combination of the work of farming with the cares and obligations of family life can be a sure road to sanctity. St. Isidore and S. Maria de la Cabeza exemplified the Christian ideal of land-home-family-work-worship in every aspect of their daily lives.

Moreover, the Church has traditionally regarded a home on the land as the ideal place in which to develop genuine Christian family life. Pius XII gave expression to this belief in his address to farmers (November 15, 1946): “Your lives are rooted in the family–universally, deeply, and completely; consequently, they conform very closely to nature. In this fact lies your economic strength and your ability to withstand adversity in critical times. Your being so strongly rooted in the family constitutes the importance of your contribution to the correct development of the private and public order of society.”

Farming is a family enterprise which tends to weld the family together. Mother and father are usually within calling distance of each other and see each other several times a day. The children can be at their parents’ side to watch them and learn to work with them. There are many little tasks which children can perform that contribute to the family welfare and allow them to acquire experience and habits of responsibility. It is not without reason that the rural home has been called the “natural dwelling place for the Christian family.”

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

THIRD DAY

LOVE OF NEIGHBOR

Hymn

O God, who made man from the slime
According to Your form sublime,
And made Christ share our lowliness
To let us share His holiness:

Be in each brother’s hand a light
To show the path through this dark night,
Be in us each the burning fire
That kindles love and kills desire.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. Everyone shall help his neighbor
and shall say to his brother:
Be of good courage.

(Psalm 132)

All:

Behold, how good it is, and how pleasant,
where brethren dwell as one!

It is as when the precious ointment upon the head
runs down over the beard, the beard of Aaron,
till it runs down upon the collar of his robe.

It is a dew like that of Hermon,
which comes down upon the mountains of Sion;

For there the Lord has pronounced his blessing,
life forever.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: Everyone shall help his neighbor and shall say to his brother:
Be of good courage.

P. (Chapter–Romans 12:9-12) Let love be without pretense.
Hate what is evil, hold to what is good.
Love one another with fraternal charity,
anticipating one another with honor.
Be not slothful in zeal;
be fervent in spirit,
serving the Lord,
rejoicing in hope,
Be patient in tribulation,
persevering in prayer.

R. Thanks be to God.
V. You are citizens with the saints.

R. And members of God’s household.
V. The Lord be with you.

R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. O God, You make all things work together
unto good for those who love You.
Give to our hearts an abiding love for You,
so that the desires we conceive by Your inspiration
may ever remain unchanged in spite of every temptation,
through Christ Our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

To express the unity of His Mystical Body, Christ chose the striking farm symbol of the vine and the branches. And immediately thereafter, He reminded us of the hard farm reality that the barren plant must be destroyed: If anyone does not abide in me, he shall be cast outside as the branch and wither; and they shall gather them up and cast them into the fire, and they shall burn.” (John 15:6) The test that our Lord applied to distinguish the good grain from the bad is love of neighbor: “This is my commandment that you love one another, as I have loved you.” (John 15:12)

Each profession has its own peculiar way of helping its members to manifest love for neighbor, and it is the honorable lot of the farmer to provide the basic food and fiber and shelter for man’s daily needs. From the example of St. Isidore we learn that our daily life is not to be a selfish quest for profit, but an opportunity to serve. It makes us realize that we need the help of others to continue this way of life. Rural people can well apply to themselves these words of Pope Pius XI: “All the institutions for the establishment of peace and the promotion of mutual help among men, however perfect these may seem, have the principal foundation of their stability in the mutual bond of minds and hearts whereby the members are united one with another. If this bond is lacking, the best of regulations are useless. And so, then only will true cooperation be possible for a single common good, when the various parts of society deeply feel themselves members of one great family and children of the same heavenly Father; we are one body in Christ, ‘but severally members one of another,’ so that ‘if one member suffers anything, all the members suffer with it.'”

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

FOURTH DAY

IGNITY OF WORK

Hymn

Lord, our God, whose mighty hand
Carved out the seas and built the land;
Who, by the labors of our Lord,
The honor Adam lost, restored:

Let us be joined to Christ, Your Son,
That in His work we may be one;
So we shall in our work partake
Of God, whom we by sloth forsake.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your Son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. The work of the just is unto life:
but the fruit of the wicked unto sin.

(Psalm 126)

All: Unless the Lord built the house,
they labor in vain who build it.

Unless the Lord guard the city,
in vain does the guard keep vigil.

It is vain for you to rise early,
or put off your rest,

You that eat hard-earned bread,
for he gives to his beloved in sleep.

Behold, sons are a gift from the Lord;
the fruit of the womb is a reward.

Like arrows in the hand of a warrior
are the sons of one’s youth.

Happy the man whose quiver is filled with them;
he shall not be put to
shame when they contend with enemies at the gate.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: The work of the just is unto life:
but the fruit of the wicked unto sin.

P. (Chapter–II Thessalonians 3:8-12)
Neither did we eat any man’s bread at his cost,
but we worked night and day in labor and toil,
so that we might not burden any of you.
Not that we did not have the right to do so,
but that we might make ourselves an example for you to imitate us.
For, indeed when we were with you we used to charge you:
if any man will not work, neither let him eat.
For we have heard that some among you are living irregularly,
doing no work but busy at meddling.
Now such persons we charge and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ
that with quietness they work and eat their own bread.

R. Thanks be to God.
V. Honor the Lord with your substance.

R. And give him of the first of all your fruits.
V. The Lord be with you.

R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. O Lord, let us follow the blessed farmer Isidore’s example of patience
and humility, and walk so faithfully in his footsteps that by his
intercession in the evening of life, we can offer You a rich harvest of
merits and good works, through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

St. Paul in his first epistle to the Thessalonians (4:11) says, “Strive to live peacefully, minding your own affairs, working with your own hands, as we charged you, so that you may walk becomingly towards outsiders, and may need nothing.”

The nobility of physical labor is praised both in the Old and New Testaments. The humble workshop of Nazareth and the little hillside and stony field where the Holy Family worked and earned its sustenance are shining examples of the regard in which Christ Himself held physical labor. “Christ took for granted the duty of labor. His parables presuppose the law of work. They have for their protagonist, a sower, a vineyard planter, a shepherd, a fisherman, a housebuilder, an employer, a housekeeper. They allude to their work as something natural, something presupposed.” (“The Attitude Towards Labor in Early Christianity and Ancient Culture,” Geohegan)

Throughout the centuries the most prominent Church writers taught the nobility of labor while great saints, by their personal example, pointed the way for all of us to follow. “Manual labor is absolutely necessary for the preservation of the human race. The earth does not give up her many fruits except by the labor of men. Since man needs the fruits of the earth to sustain life, it follows that he must work to get them.” (“The Philosophy of Labor According to Thomas Aquinas,” Killeen.)

One of the greatest evils in the world today is the dislike for physical labor and the effort many people make to avoid it. In so doing they go counter to the teaching and example of Christ, the saints, and the repeated urgings of our great Pontiffs in Rome.

Pius XII stated most emphatically, “As an indispensable means toward gaining over the world that mastery which God wishes, for His glory, all work has an inherent dignity and at the same time a close connection with the perfection of the person; this is the noble dignity and privilege of work, which is not in any way cheapened by the fatigue and the burden, which have to be borne as the effect of original sin, in obedience and submission to the will of God.”

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

FIFTH DAY

WALKING IN THE PRESENCE OF GOD

Hymn

As we, if we should ride upon
The golden wings (O God) of dawn,
And seek the ends of earth and sky,
Could not escape Your loving eye:

We beg that we by faith may see
Your sweet and fierce ubiquity,
And may deserve at last by grace
To see You always face to face.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. O taste, and see that the Lord is sweet:
blessed is the man who hopes in him.

(Psalm 1)

All: Happy the man who follows not the counsel of the wicked,

Nor walks in the way of sinners,
nor sits in the company of the insolent,

But delights in the law of the Lord
and meditates on his law day and night.

He is like a tree planted near running water,
that yields fruit in due season,
and whose leaves never fade.

Whatever he does prospers. Not so the wicked, not so;
they are like chaff which the wind drives away.

Therefore in judgment the wicked shall not stand,
nor shall sinners, in the assembly of the just.

For the Lord watches over the way of the just,
but the way of the wicked vanishes.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: O taste, and see that the Lord is sweet
blessed is the man who hopes in him.

P. (Chapter–I Timothy 4:15-16)
Meditate on these things,
give yourself entirely to them,
that your progress may be manifest to all.
Take heed to yourself and to your teaching,
be earnest in them.
For in so doing you will save both yourself and those who hear you.

R. Thanks be to God.
V. The law of the Lord is perfect, refreshing the soul.

R. The decree of the Lord is trustworthy, giving wisdom to the simple.
V. The Lord be with you.

R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. Breathe into our hearts, we beg You, O Lord,
a desire for heavenly glory,
and grant that we may come,
bearing in Our hands the sheaves of justice,
to where the blessed Isidore is resplendent with You in glory,
through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

“In the realm of nature, the farmer lives and works with God. He has abundant reasons to thank God for the independence and liberty granted him through the soil he calls his own. He has the right to the genuine respect of others, for without him others cannot live. And he ought to have a high sense of self-respect, based on the nobility of his work, which is so vital to humanity. Living close to nature, rural people do not find it difficult to live close to God, the Author of Nature. Moreover, they are blessed in this that they are free from so many occasions of sin and temptation which abound elsewhere. Therefore, the supernatural life should flourish best in rural surroundings. There men and women can best know, love and serve God, and save their immortal souls.” (From Pastoral Letter of the Archbishops and Bishops of the Ecclesiastical Provinces of Toronto and Kingston, Canada.)

However, communion with God and high esteem for their work are not enjoyed by farmers without a constant effort. Many of them seem to be unaware of the many beauties and advantages of rural living and consider their lives uninteresting and their work drudgery. It is the purpose of novenas such as this, and other prayers and rural religious customs and practices, to inspire rural people anew with the dignity of their vocation and the fruitfulness of their work, so that they can continue to be worthy of being called collaborators with God.

My farm is not where I must soil My hands in endless, dreary toil. But where, through seed and swelling pod, I’ve learned to walk, and talk, with God.

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

SIXTH DAY

STEWARDSHIP OF THE SOIL

Hymn

O Lord, as You by Your command
For all men’s use have made the land,
Yet have allowed man’s wise decree Rule it be cared for privately;

Let us know that what we control
Is made for mankind as a whole,
And we must an accounting give
Of what God lends us while we live.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord,
Your Son, Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. And other seeds fell upon good ground, and yielded fruit,
some a hundredfold, some sixtyfold, and some thirtyfold.

(Psalm 64:10-14)

All: You have visited the land and watered it;
greatly have you enriched it.

God’s watercourses are filled;
you have prepared the grain.

Thus have you prepared the land,
drenching its furrows,
breaking up its clods.

Softening it with showers,
blessing its yield.

You have crowned the year with your bounty,
and your paths overflow with a rich harvest;

The untilled meadows overflow with it,
and rejoicing clothes the hills.

The fields are garmented with flocks
and the valleys blanketed with grain.
They shout and sing for joy.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: And other seeds fell upon good ground, and yielded fruit,
some a hundred fold, some sixtyfold, and some thirtyfold.

P. (Chapter–James 5:7-10)
Be patient therefore, brethren,
until the coming of the Lord.
Behold, the farmer waits for the precious fruits of the earth,
being patient until it receives the early and late rain.
Do you also be patient;
strengthen your hearts;
for the coming of the Lord is at hand.

R. Thanks be to God.

V. Prepare your work outdoors, and diligently till the ground.
R. That afterwards you may build your house.

Let us pray.

P. Pour down Your blessing, we beg of You, O Lord,
upon Your people, and upon all the fruits of the earth,
so that when collected they may be mercifully distributed
to the honor and glory of Your holy name,
through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

The surface of the earth is particularly within the care of the farmer. He keeps it for his own sustenance and gain, but his gain is also the gain of all the rest of us. At best, he accumulates little to himself. The successful farmer is the one who produces more than he needs for his support; and the overplus he does not keep; moreover, his own needs are easily satisfied. It is of the utmost consequence that the man next to the earth shall lead a fair and simple life; for in riotous living he might halt many good supplies that now go to his fellows.

It is a public duty so to train the farmer that he shall appreciate his guardianship. He is engaged in a quasi-public business. He really does not even own his land. He does not take his land with him, but only the personal development that he gains from it. He cannot annihilate his land, as another might destroy all his belongings. He is God’s partner, the representative of society to guard and to subdue the surface of the earth. He must exercise his dominion with due regard to all these obligations. He is a trustee. The productiveness of the earth must increase from generation to generation: this also is his obligation. He must handle all his materials, remembering man and remembering God. (“The Holy Earth,” by L. H. Bailey.)

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

SEVENTH DAY

RURAL WORKS OF MERCY

Hymn

0 God, as Jesus by His birth
Became our fellow man on earth,
And raised man, by His brotherhood,
To His divine similitude:

We beg that we in men may see
The form of Your divinity,
What good for fellow men we do
Accept as being done for You.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done
Who lives and reigns, our Lord,
Your Son, Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

(Psalm 111)

All: Happy is the man who fears the Lord,
who greatly delights in his commands.

His posterity shall be mighty upon the earth;
the upright generation shall be blessed.

Wealth and riches shall be in his house;
his generosity shall endure forever.

He draws through the darkness, a light for the upright;
he is gracious and merciful and just.

Well for the man who is gracious and lends,
who conducts his affairs with justice;

He shall never be moved;
the just man shall be in everlasting remembrance.

An evil report he shall not fear;
his heart is firm, trusting in the Lord.

His heart is steadfast;
he shall not fear till he looks down upon his foes.

Lavishly he gives to the poor;
his generosity shall endure forever;
his horn shall be exalted in glory.

The wicked man shall see it and be vested;
he shall gnash his teeth and pine away;
the desire of the wicked shall perish.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be
world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

P. (Chapter–Matthew 6:19-20)
Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth,
where rust and moth consume,
where thieves break in and steal;
but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven,
where neither rust nor moth consumes,
nor thieves break in and steal.
For where your treasure is,
there your heart also will be.

R. Thanks be to God.
V. He who trusts in his riches shall fall.

R. But the just shall spring up as a green leaf.
V. The Lord be with you.

R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. May the grace of the Holy Spirit,
we beg You, O Lord,
enlighten our hearts,
and refresh them abundantly
with the sweetness of perfect charity,
through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

Although St. Isidore and his wife, S. Maria de la Cabeza, were very poor, they gave of what they had to those who were poorer than themselves. Every Saturday they would serve a meal to the poor whom they had met in their daily visits to the churches of Madrid. One day after all the food had been given out, a latecomer arrived, hungry and destitute. Although St. Isidore knew that his wife had already served all the food they had in the house, he asked her to look again into the kettle to see if there might not be just one more serving left. S. Maria obediently lifted up the kettle to see if there were anything remaining, and was surprised to find that it was as heavy as if nothing had been taken out of it.

Works of mercy take on different forms in different times and countries. In the frontier days in America, typical ways of helping one’s neighbors were: wholehearted hospitality to strangers and travelers; quick assistance to sick and bereaved families, even to the extent of doing the plowing or harvesting for them if necessary; helping other families with greater than family-size projects like barn-raising or butchering; and special help at times of crisis like drought, hail, prairie fire, etc. Many opportunities like these still occur in rural communities, but in addition, new ways of helping one’s neighbor are constantly arising. For instance, it may often be possible for older farmers to help inexperienced farmers in adopting new and better farming methods, or it may be possible to be of service to one’s community as a whole by helping to organize a soil conservation district, improve the school system, or provide better roads or other means of communication. A Christian farmer will also be on the alert to help his pastor in parish projects for adult education, recreation, or in expanding parish facilities. Finally, many opportunities will arise for the modern farmer to give of his abundance to the less fortunate farmers, who comprise three-fourths of the world’s population, in other lands.

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

EIGHTH DAY

TRUST IN PRAYER

Hymn

O God, as You by Your pure gift
By grace our nature do uplift,
And make it possible to be
What You, God, are essentially.

We pray You then to hear our prayer,
For it is Christ’s, whose life we share;
And since we share Christ’s nature, we
Can pray, like Christ, almightily.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your Son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. Therefore I say to you, all things whatever you ask for in prayer,
believe that you shall receive, and they shall come to you.

(Psalm 85:1-10)

All: Incline your ear, O Lord;
answer me for I am afflicted and poor.

Keep my life, for I am devoted to you;
save your servant who trusts in you.

You are my God; have pity on me, O Lord,
for to you I call all the day.

Gladden the soul of your servant,
for to You, O Lord, I lift up my soul;

For you, O Lord, are good and forgiving,
abounding in kindness to all who call upon You,

Hearken, O Lord, to my prayer
and attend to the sound of my pleading.

In the day of my distress I call upon you,
for you will answer me.

There is none like you among the gods, O Lord,
and there are no works like yours.

All the nations you have made shall come and worship you, O Lord,
and glorify your name.

For you are great, and you do wondrous deeds;
you alone are God.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: Therefore I say to you, all things whatever you ask for in prayer,
believe that you shall receive, and they shall come to you.

P. (Chapter–Philippians 4:47)
Rejoice in the Lord always:
again I say, rejoice.
Let your moderation be known to all men.
The Lord is near.
Have no anxiety,
but in every prayer and supplication with thanksgiving
let your petitions be made known to God.
And may the peace of God
which surpasses all understanding
guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

R. Thanks be to God.

V. I will sing praise to You in the sight of the angels.
R. I will worship toward Your holy temple,
and I will give glory to Your name.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray.

P. O Lord Jesus Christ, You have said: Ask and you shall receive,
seek and you shall find,
knock and it shall be opened unto you.
Grant, we beg of You, to us Your supplicants,
the gift of Your most divine love,
so that we may love You with our whole heart
and in all our words and works,
and never cease praising You,
who live and are King world without end.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

A farmer daily sees the handiwork of God in the world of nature about him and recognizes that he is utterly dependent upon God’s bounty for the success of his harvest and deliverance from calamities. It is therefore the most obvious and natural thing for him to call upon the Lord of the harvest to obtain His blessing upon everything he undertakes. Trust in prayer was the most distinguishing trait in the life of St. Isidore. It was his custom to rise before dawn and spend the early part of the day making visits to churches in and about Madrid.. The story is told that his employer, Master de Vargas, became disturbed about the amount of time St. Isidore was taking from his work, and decided to see for himself if reports which had come to him were as bad as they sounded. One morning he hid himself in the field where the saint was supposed to be plowing. When the saint returned even later than usual from his morning pilgrimage, the other workers had finished their jobs and had left the field, while St. Isidore’s work was still untouched. Master de Vargas was about to rebuke the saint, but something told him to wait and see what would happen. The saint set to work and seemed to be making a great deal of progress. As the employer watched, he saw the reason: two angels were working side by side with the saint, each guiding a plow and racing in holy rivalry to see who could get the most done. After that whenever anyone asked the Master de Vargas about St. Isidore’s work, he would answer simply, “Angels are his helpers.” While rural people will follow St. Isidore’s example of combining prayer with work, their religious life in general will be centered about the rural parish. The parish church is the center of life’s most important moments– baptism, confirmation, penance, marriage and, above all, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass and Holy Communion. The cemetery recalls the labors of the pioneers who went before, and the catechism classroom is the place of training future workers for Christ. Father of all, the rural pastor has been called “God” sacred gift to mankind sent by divine appointment on a mission whose field is not a given parish or diocese, but the world; whose end is the glory of God and the salvation of souls everywhere; whose means are the sacraments and the preaching of the Gospel; the object of whose teaching is everything knowable, from the deep things in God to all things outside of God.” (Most Reverend William A. Griffin.)

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

NINTH DAY

SACRIFICE OF PRAISE

Hymn

Lord, who before Your praise was heard
Were praised in silence by the Word,
And whom, from all eternity
Your Son has praised sufficiently:

Please deign to be our hallowing,
And we in Christ Your Son will sing,
Then Your poor creatures’ prayers will rise
Sufficient praise before Your eyes.

Through Jesus Christ let this be done,
Who lives and reigns, our Lord, Your Son,
Whom with the Spirit we adore,
One God with You forevermore.

Antiphon

P. Whatever you do in word or in work,
do all in the name of the Lord Jesus,
giving thanks to God the Father through him.

(Psalm 22)

All: The Lord is my shepherd: I shall not want.
In verdant pastures he gives me repose.

Beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.

He guides me in right paths;
for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk in the dark valley I fear no evil;
for you are at my side

With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.

You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes; You anoint my head with oil,
my cup overflows.

Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;

And I shall dwell in the house of the Lord for years to come.

Glory be to the Father,
and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning,
is now and ever shall be world without end.

Amen.

Antiphon

All: Whatever you do in word or in work,
do all in the name of the Lord Jesus,
giving thanks to God the Father through him.

P (Chapter–Hebrews 10:12-14)
Jesus, having offered one sacrifice for sins,
has taken his seat forever at the right hand of God,
waiting thenceforth until his enemies
be made the footstool under his feet.
For by one offering he has perfected forever those who are sanctified.

R. Thanks be to God.

V. Offer to God the sacrifice of praise.
R. And pay your vows to the Most High.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

Let us pray

P. Protect us, O Lord;
who offer holocausts to You,
and sear our hearts with the flame of Your divine charity,
so that they may be ever more fervently prepared for sacrifice,
through Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. St. Isidore.
R. Pray for us.

Prayer in Honor of Saint Isidore

All:

O God, who taught Adam the simple art of tilling the soil,
and who through Jesus Christ, the true vine,
revealed Yourself the husbandman of our souls,
deign, we pray, through the merits of blessed Isidore,
to instill into our hearts a horror of sin and a love of prayer,
so that, working the soil in the sweat of our brow,
we may enjoy eternal happiness in heaven,
through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.

V. The Lord be with you.
R. And with your spirit.

V. Let us bless the Lord.
R. Thanks be to God.

V. May the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace.
R. Amen.

REFLECTIONS

A farmer can justly take pride in the fact that his work is a very special contribution to the Sacrifice of the Mass, and he should meditate upon this truth with humility and gratitude. “The Lord used the product of wheat and of grapes, bread and wine, for the institution of the august sacrament of the Holy Eucharist. Bread and wine are the substances changed into the substance of the Body and Blood of our blessed Savior. Their sense appearances are the carriers of the most precious gifts of our Lord’s love to us. In the consecrated elements of bread and wine, Jesus Christ makes Himself present to be the spiritual food of men. He is the bread that has come down from heaven, of which if men eat they shall not die. With good reason, then, has Christian tradition used the sheaf of wheat and the vine with grapes, these precious products of the toil of the farmer, as the symbols of the Holy Eucharist. Both adorn tabernacle and altar as symbols to give vivid expression to this great and loving mystery of our Catholic faith; both play their part in beautifying art and architecture; both enrich hymns and sacred songs composed to give honor to our Lord in the Holy Eucharist. As he kneels in prayer before the tabernacle the farmer indeed has reason to glory in all this and to give profound thanks to his Lord and Master for having honored his calling in so exalted a manner.” (From “Partnership with God,” by the Most Reverend Aloisius J. Muench.)

Say 3 Our Father…
Say 3 Hail Mary…
Say 3 Glory Be…

followed by the prayer of you choice for special needs.

Source:
http://www.catholicdoors.com/prayers/english3/p02660.htm

See also:
http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/prayers/view.cfm?id=829

* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *

CAUSE

Gift Giving December 2008

On the 24th of December in 2008, about 300 children were gathered in the public auditorium of Barangay San Bonifacio to attend a Gift-giving Program prepared by the Barangay Pastoral Council with the support of the barangay officials, concerned citizens,  and youth volunteers.

The event primarily benefited the elementary school and out-of-school children as well as toddlers. Their parents and/or some of their family members also came to accompany them. A Clown Presentation made the program more exciting. It was obvious that it was, for most of them, their first time to see such an amazing live entertainment. Though not an ordinary person could do the magic tricks, they were pretty simple but everyone really enjoyed what they saw. The children were asked to dance and they were given food and loot bags which made them even more satisfied and delightful.

Having a chance to see such astonishing smile of the crowd, especially the children, made me realize that Christmas isn’t just about sharing but having fun and laughter with other people and friends. Material things may make people happy but showing one’s love marks people’s heart with long lasting joy and good inspiration.

We wish to express our gratitude to all the volunteers and benefactors for a job well done. May God continue to bless and guide each and everyone of us we make each day a celebration of His love.

*******

Gift Giving December 2009

The success of the 2009 gift-giving program was realized once again. We appreciate the generosity of the sponsors, help of the volunteers and and participation of the children and their parents. We wish to thank everyone as well as Rev. Father Joy Casaclang for officiating the anticipated Mass in celebration of our Lord Jesus Christ’s birth.

*******

Gift Giving December 2010

It was a clear fine afternoon on the 29th of December 2011, when we started the parlor games for the children. The number of kids who were there was about a hundred and it continued to grow until Msgr. Cris Draculan had arrived for the Holy Mass. I wasn’t sure if it was the poor sound system, the wide area, or the large crowd that made the reverend father complained about the pain on his throat right after the mass as we approached to thank him. Despite that experience, the smile on his face showed he was overwhelmed with the event, the people, and the newly improved barangay stadium, which he Blessed before the mass had ended.

It was unusual for this event to have as many as 400 individuals during a mass. I noticed that in our community, even in other occasions like baptism, wedding or funeral, people only arrive the moment the food is opened for the guests. They don’t really go to the church and they don’t’ really care about the dead, the celebrators, or the family at all. Their presence was intended to only to have their share of whatever food the host could prepare. Whatever the reason was for the unexpected number of individuals who attended the Mass, it is hoped that this year’s Gift Giving program will be more organized and well planned, especially on how to discipline the children.

As I, together with SIYA Angels, facilitated the games for the Gift Giving Program, I realized the adults were more excited than the young ones. They were very eager to win prizes so they couldn’t help but assist their child/children to be able to accomplish our instructions and lead in every game activity. It was difficult for us to manage some of the kids because the adults themselves were breaking our rules. It’s a manifestation that parents of today lack self discipline, understanding, and sensitivity that is why we can’t blame children if they seem unruly and disobedient because they don’t often see good examples at home.

I believe it’s not too late to try to change people’s attitude. My experience in working with the children and the youth in this community shows that they listen when you are serious about what you’re saying and they follow if they see that you can do well what you’re asking them to do. Leadership by example, as Richard Gordon popularized it, is all we need for our nation to become a better place to live in. It is important for each of us to take actions toward better character and self discipline. We should not feel we are crazy or lost when we do the right things. When I speak of righteousness, it’s not about being the authority, the best, or the know-it-all, but meekness and having the right attitude in acting for the common good which Jesus advocated throughout his lifetime.